Why can’t all documents be Easy Read?

section of the front cover of willing to work report by human rights commissionIf you haven’t seen what an Easy Read document looks like then the report, Willing to Work Easy Read version by the Human Rights Commission, is an excellent example. It contains all the key information in short sentences that suit a wide audience, including people who do not have English as a first language. It is universally designed. So it begs the question, why aren’t all reports written this way? Unless you really need the fine detail, the Easy Read summary version gives most people all the key information quickly and easily.

Black and white logo for easy read, has a tick and a open bookThe Willing to Work report was launched in May 2016. It was a response to the overwhelming number of discrimination complaints relating to employment for both older people and people with disability. It has some interesting facts and shows how poorly we compare to other developed countries around the world in terms of employment. You can download the full report in both PDF and Word from the Human Rights Commission website.

Cathy Basterfield will be making a presentation at the Universal Design Conference on this topic. Her short abstract: “The 44% of the adult population with non-functional literacy are rarely considered in the move for a more inclusive society. Access to information is a critical factor for inclusion and this presentation will show how to plan Easy English in the development of written materials, both printed and online.”

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