Do we need another form of Braille?

The picture shows a book in landscape with large red icons of the Elia Frames system and a person's hand touching the raised icons.People who are born blind are introduced to Braille from an early age. But what if you become blind at a later age? Is Braille the most suitable system for accessing text, and even if it is, how easy is it to learn? This is a tricky area to navigate in terms of design and policy. However, someone has come up with a tactile system that is based on the alphabet that sighted people know and is easier to learn later in life. It has one an award for innovation. In the article, The Complicated Quest to Redesign Braille, readers are taken through the story and the rationale for the development. The developer claims the new tactile markers are easier and quicker to learn than Braille. Of course, there is no reason why both systems can’t co-exist – the universal solution. The point is also made that the digital world has changed much for people who are blind with products and services such as talking books and podcasts.

The article was found on the Fast Co.Design website.  

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