Accessible rail travel

A train line disappears in the distance and in the foreground is a red rail indicator light.How does Australia rate globally when it comes to rail travel and related public infrastructure? Well, that depends. A new report compares Australia with UK, Spain, Sweden, and United States. Other types of global rankings are included in the report by Claire Shooter of the Rail Safety and Standards Board in UK. Of course, there are considerable variations within countries too. There’s a lot of good information in this report and it’s worth a browse.

The executive summary explains there were two main messages throughout the literature on improving accessibility:
1. Designing transport to be accessible to all has benefits far beyond making the transport network accessible to people with disabilities; It improves the experience of tourists, shoppers, families, people with temporary disabilities and pregnant women. Taking visible steps towards improving accessibility itself encourages more people to use the service.
2. It is critical to engage people with disability in the choice, design, and implementation of accessibility improvements to ensure they are appropriate and effective. Not only does this increase the confidence of people with disability that the transport network cares about catering to them, it can avoid costly investments in inadequate solutions.

The report, Rail travel and disability: An international perspective on accessibility. is on the RSSB website. Note: accessing via the website requires a free login process. It is a bit cumbersome but it provides access to other documents as well. Or you can download directly from this website

The objectives of the research:

As a result of actual or perceived difficulty using public transport, many people with disabilities (PwD) rely on private vehicles, taxis, or designated paratransit services to travel. In Australia, the Australasian Centre for Rail Innovation (ACRI) based in Canberra and CQUniversity are conducting research to better understand what could be done to improve use of public transport by PwD. Under a memorandum of understanding, ACRI and the Rail Safety and Standards Board (RSSB) of Great Britain regularly share knowledge to add value to the research and innovation activities of both countries. This report is the first joint initiative between ACRI and RSSB, which aims to conduct a global horizon scan of accessibility innovations and practices in sectors including transport, retail and hospitality that may aid the rail travel experience for people with a disability.