Upcoming conferences

Aerial view of a crowded conference scene where the session has finished and people are standing, sitting and walking about.Universal Design & Higher Education in Transformation Congress, 30 Oct – 2 November 2018, Dublin Castle, Ireland.

Australian Assistive Technology Conference 14-16 November 2018, Melbourne Convention & Exhibition Centre.

AAG Conference “Advancing not Retiring: Active Players, A Fair Future” 21-23 November 2018, Melbourne.

Age & Work Symposium, 27 November 2018, QUT Brisbane. CUDA Director, Prof Philip Taylor will be contributing to this celebration of longevity.

2019

Australian Network on Disability Conference 14 May 2019 in Melbourne. This conference is employment related.

ACAA Access Consultants National Conference, 14-16 August 2019, Luna Park Sydney. 

Constructing our World: People, Performance, Politics 18-20 September 2019, Sydney. Submissions are open for registration and exhibition.

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Look at me!

An orange automated vehicle has eyes that appear to be looking at a pedestrianWorried that a driverless car won’t see or detect you? With a driver you can check to see if they are looking your way, but if there is no driver, that can be a worry. Autonomous vehicles are posing many problems for designers who are grappling with most of them quite successfully. So for this problem Jaguar has come up with a car with googly eyes. The “eyes” don’t “see” you, but it can give confidence that you have been detected because the eyes follow you as you cross the pedestrian crossing. I should think that once we get used to automated vehicles, eventually eyes will be phased out. Amy Child from Arup gave an entertaining presentation on this and other aspects of the move to driverless cars, including the googly eyes. The transcript of Amy’s keynote presentation can be downloaded in Word. 

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It was a great conference!

With more than 120 attendees, five countries present and five Australian states represented, it was a very successful Australian Universal Design Conference. The atmosphere was abuzz with like-minded colleagues catching up and new friendships forming. We were welcomed by Meaghan Scanlon, Assistant Minister for Tourism Industry Development, and Neroli Holmes, Acting Anti-Discrimination Commissioner. The conference opened with Nicki Hutley, who gave us the benefit of her years of research and declared that everyone benefits from inclusion both economically and socially. Lots to think about when it comes to self driving cars and Amy Child covered some of the many aspects to consider. Here are some of the slides from concurrent session speakers on day one – more to come next newsletter:

Thea Kurdi from Canada –  Living in Place:Who are we designing for?

Lorraine Guthrie from New Zealand – Accessibility Charter for Canterbury: Collaborating to go beyone compliance

Michael Small – Developing the conditions to support a universal design approach

Emily Steel – Universal Design in social policy: Addressing the paradox of equality

Tom Bevan – Case Study: Accessible beaches for all.

Elise Copeland from New Zealand – A universal design tool for mixed use buildings. Slideshow was too big to upload but the transcript is provided plus the video below. You can go to the Auckland website to see the UD Design Tool.

 

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IAUD Conference Thailand

IAUD logo with coloured matchstick figures.The next International Association for Universal Design Conference will be held in Bankok, Thailand 5-6 March 2019. It is not clear from the website whether the call for submissions closes 31 August 2018 or 30 November, which is definitely the date for full paper submissions. You can find out more from the conference website. Topics are wide-ranging. This is usually a large international affair. IAUD is based in Japan and was originaly initiated by product manufacturers recognising that the population was ageing. Not the most intuitively designed conference website, but the information is there and also links to previous conference papers that could be of interest. .

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Universal Design: Revolution or Evolution? A breakfast event

Flyer picture of three Barangaroo towers with the title of the event.CUDA and Lendlease have organised a breakfast event at Barangaroo in Sydney. Three great speakers, a light breakfast and networking all for just $10.

Jason Barker, Principal, Design for Dignity, will discuss how universal design was embraced during the development of Barangaroo. Chris Veitch, Access New Business (UK) will bring his international experience of inclusive destinations and tourism and the development of Visit Britain website. He will be fresh from the UD Conference in BrisbaneFiona Morrison, Commissioner Open Space and Parklands, NSW Department of Planning, will talk about inclusively designing guidelines for inclusive playspaces. Annie Tennant, General Manager, Sustainability and Culture, Lendlease, will chair the event. Download the flyer or register to attend using the links below. Our thanks to Lendlease for their support for this event.

12 September 2018 8:00am to 9:30am

Register:  https://udaustralia.eventbrite.com.au

Enquiriesevents.udaustralia@gmail.com or call 0431 345 235 for access enquiries.

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Thanks for your support

A tile showing all the logos of conference supporters.Thanks to all our conference supporters for promoting our upcoming conference. Is your association logo there? Perhaps you could get CPD points for attending.  Looking forward to seeing you all at the conference – only three weeks to go! 

For more detail and to register see the conference website. The theme is Home and Away: Creating inclusion everywhere. This is a conference for the people who make the decisions that create inclusion. So anyone involved in housing and built environment, destination planning, tourism and place making should come along. It’s a great program!

  • Two day registration is $675.00 + GST
  • One day registration is $400.00 +GST
  • Student registration is $350.00 + GST

Missed the earlybird rate? Email Jane udaustralia@gmail.com.

Logos include: ARATA, AIB, ANUHD, LGNSW, Philip Chun, SCAAN, RICS, ATDW, QAUHD, Touched by Olivia, SCAAN, University of Cambridge. Hosted by COTA Queensland and CUDA, and organised by Interpoint Events.

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Can everybody hear me? Protocol for meetings and events

Front cover of the protocol for meetings and events. People who can’t hear well at meetings tend to avoid them. This means their voices are left out of focus groups and community consultations. Consequently, hearing issues are not heard or catered for (excuse pun). It also means they don’t go to group events at restaurants or even family gatherings because it gets frustrating and also tiring when trying to concentrate on listening all the time. Ideas for Ears in the UK is actively advocating for people with hearing loss and has developed the Hearing Access Protocol for meetings and events. it provides guidance on how to run meetings and events so people with any hearing ability can hear and follow them. The Protocol was developed by people with hearing loss. You can download the PDF version of the Protocol. People with hearing loss should be able to participate in civic events and activities on the same basis as others.

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Constructing our World Conference 2019

Constructing our world conference bannerSave the Date for this Conference. How should we educate and train our builders for the future? Are our current systems keeping up with the demands of new technology? What might the buildings of the future demand of builders’ knowledge and processes? What are the politicians planning for our sector and how do the financiers see the future for building in our region?  The 2019 Constructing Our World Conference in Sydney will address these questions and more.  The organisers are planning two days of speakers and interactive sessions as well as time to enjoy the sights and attractions of beautiful Sydney. Builders, project managers, educators, students, government policy makers, suppliers and construction allied personnel are sure to enjoy and benefit from attendance at the conference.

There will be an extended program for international delegates which will include fringe events  as well as a welcome reception on the eve of the conference. Constructing Our World is an initiative in collaboration with the Australian Institute of Building, the New Zealand Institute of Building and the Singapore Institute of Building Limited.  

Save the date 18 – 20 September 2019. Expressions of Interest are being accepted now. 

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2018 Assistive Techology Conference

ARATA logoThe Australian Assistive Rehabilitation and Assistive Technology Association conference will be in Melbourne 14-16 November 2018. Three full days of evidence and practice-based sessions, discussions, posters and demonstrations, and much more. National and international keynote speakers, a breakfast session and trade display all make for a jam-packed event.

Universal Design and Assistive Technolgy (AT) are partners in the same quest – inclusion and participation for everyone. AAATE believes that UD (Design for All) and AT should be looked at as part of the same domain of knowledge, rather that deal with these as two distinct domains. Practitioners in the UD world focus on designs that are inclusive and enabling rather than excluding. However, UD is not the answer to everything and some people need individual solutions and specialised designs. The simplest example is a paraplegic needs both a wheelchair and a step-free entry. One is no good without the other. AT is now a major part of the NDIS and there is growing interest in this field

banner for ARATA conference

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Hearing Loops – fixed or portable?

A woman with dark hair wearing a light blue shirt holds her right hand up to cup her ear to indicate she is trying to hear somethingMany people have heard of hearing loops, but few understand the options and how they work. Ideas for Ears in the UK tweeted a blog article with some explanations of the differences. Some systems are suited for face to face customer service, others are suited for large auditoriums. Then there are others that are portable. Knowing which one to use and when is critical for people who need them. Yes, a reminder that one in six people have hearing loss. For an Australian look at these systems, ClearaSound has some good fact sheets that explain the systems really well. However, even when the equipment is installed, the sound professionals or other responsible staff do not check to see if it is working at all times. Also, most systems only work in conjunction with the speaker using a microphone. “Can everyone hear me – I don’t need a microphone?” is not what people want to hear.  You might also like to look at the Better Hearing Australia website. 

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