The Provision of Visitable Housing in Australia: Down to the detail

Article by Margaret Ward and Jill Franz, published in Housing and Space: Toward Socio-Spatial Inclusion (Social Inclusion, Vol 3 No2). An Open Access Journal.

This article outlines the findings from interviews with industry personnel about incorporating the 8 features agreed in the Livable Housing Design Guidelines. This is a telling paragraph:
“In summary, when providing the eight features for visitability, the interviewees identified two themes for non-compliance (“lack of thought” and “otherness”) and three themes for compliance (“fashion”, “requirement’ and “good practice”). Although all dwellings provided some features, no dwelling provided a coherent path of travel necessary to make a dwelling visitable. Some examples of this incoherence were: a step-free driveway which led to a step at the door; a wide front door which led to a narrow corridor; and a narrow internal doorway which did not allow entry of a wheel-chair to a spacious bathroom. The provision of these access features separately and severally did not provide visitability as an outcome in any of the dwellings.

You can download the full issue of the publication here

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Livable Housing Design – is it likely to work?

In this paper from the State of Australian Cities (SOAC) Conference in 2011, Margaret Ward traces the history of National Dialogue on Universal Housing Design to the current organisation, Livable Housing Australia and the voluntary code, the Livable Housing Design Guidelines.  She outlines why the voluntary approach is unlikely to work and that regulations will be the only way to accomplish the roll-out of more accessible homes.

Download Margaret Ward’s 2011 paper PDF

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Hope I die before I get old: state of play for housing liveability in Australia

This academic paper and presentation was made at the 2011 State of Australian Cities Conference (SOAC) in 2011 by Jane Bringolf. It raises the issues of housing an ageing population in a context of industry considering retirement villages and aged care are the places to put older people.  However, the majority of people will age in their current home – a home that is not suitably designed for this purpose.  However, some 150,000 new homes are built each year – still to the same old cookie cutter method – and there is no sign of change even in 2015.

SOAC slide cover

Download the paper  Hope I die before I get old article PDF

Download the slideshow Hope I die before I get old Slideshow PDF

 

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Equity and inclusion through housing design

Jane Bringolf’s presentation to the Brisbane Housing Forum in May 2014. She discusses different perspectives on human rights, particularly in an era of demand for cost-benefit analyses and asks the question, how can we attain our rights within a market discourse, when those who do not experience social and economic exclusion have the the power of the market in their hands?

PDF document Housing Forum Brisbane 2014  

Word document Housing Forum Brisbane 2014  

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A framework for cost benefit analysis of HASI and RRAP-D

The objective of this 2005 study was to develop a framework for the cost benefit analysis of two programs of Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, including all effects on applicants, their caregivers and their community. The two programs are the Home Adaptations for Seniors Independence Program (HASI) and Residential Rehabilitation Assistance Program for Persons with Disability (RRAP-D).  This paper includes cases studies and lessons learned in developing two methods for measuring cost-benefits. Their website might provide information on any updates to this study.  The author is Luis Rodriguez and the paper was presented at the Festival of International Conferences on Caregiving, Disability, Aging and Technology (FICCDAT) in Toronto, Canada.

 

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Barriers to Universal Design in Australian Housing

IMGP0308 20percentJane Bringolf prepared a 2000 word version of her PhD thesis for the FICCDAT Conference held in Toronto, Canada in 2011. In short the research question asked why we are still building and designing homes as if none of us is ever going to grow old. The simple answer is that the industry runs on regulations to hold the house building system together, so nothing will change without regulations. Read the paper to find out more about the complexities of the house building industry and resistance to change.

(FICCDAT is, Festival of International Conferences on Caring, Disability, Aging and Technology and is held every five years.) You can also download the slide show from the conference UD Australian Housing Bringolf slideshow

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