Progress of the National Dialogue on universal housing design

house roofsThe National Dialogue on Universal Housing Design’s 2010 voluntary strategy of providing minimum access features in all new housing by 2020 has failed to reach its interim 2013 or 2015 targets. This has not gone unnoticed by the disability and ageing sectors who supported the National Dialogue’s voluntary approach in good faith. The National Disability Strategy has committed to the 2020 target being met. The Every Australian Counts NDIS campaign are now calling for the 2020 target to be met.  

Read more about in the Report of the Progress of the National Dialogue on Universal Housing Design: NDUHD_Report_January 2015

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Trends in Universal Design

Picture of a long concrete inclined walkway with the silhouette of two wheelchair usersThis document was compiled by the Delta Centre in Norway after the 2012 International UD Conference in Oslo. The conference gathered researchers, students, users, planners, public officers and other practitioners from 44 countries.  More than 150 presentations were given.  This multidisciplinary anthology contains examples from around the globe. Download PDF Trends in Universal Design here, or access via the web.

The Delta Centre is the Government’s National Resource Centre for Participation and Accessibility, and works for an inclusive society for a diverse population.

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The Provision of Visitable Housing in Australia: Down to the detail

Article by Margaret Ward and Jill Franz, published in Housing and Space: Toward Socio-Spatial Inclusion (Social Inclusion, Vol 3 No2). An Open Access Journal.

This article outlines the findings from interviews with industry personnel about incorporating the 8 features agreed in the Livable Housing Design Guidelines. This is a telling paragraph:
“In summary, when providing the eight features for visitability, the interviewees identified two themes for non-compliance (“lack of thought” and “otherness”) and three themes for compliance (“fashion”, “requirement’ and “good practice”). Although all dwellings provided some features, no dwelling provided a coherent path of travel necessary to make a dwelling visitable. Some examples of this incoherence were: a step-free driveway which led to a step at the door; a wide front door which led to a narrow corridor; and a narrow internal doorway which did not allow entry of a wheel-chair to a spacious bathroom. The provision of these access features separately and severally did not provide visitability as an outcome in any of the dwellings.

You can download the full issue of the publication here

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Accessible Design in Australia

Accessible Design in Australia 1999 front coverThis document was produced as a result of a group of passionate people believing in the benefit of setting up an Access Institute in Australia.  They consulted widely and held two symposia, one in Sydney and one in Melbourne. The document sought further comment, particularly from people with disability.  However, for various reasons, the project ended at this point and no further action was taken.  Universal Design Australia is now attempting to pick up the threads and follow through.  Download the report: AccessibleDesignInAustraliaReport2000 PDF

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Age and Place: Bringing local government on board

This slideshow was presented by Jane Bringolf at the Australian Association of Gerontology National Conference held in Adelaide in November 2014.  It outlines the course of the COTA NSW Liveable Communities Project and the work done with 23 councils in New South Wales.

Download the PDF Jane Bringolf AAG Conference 2014 presentation

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