Universal Design, Camps & Consultation

What are the best practice methods for consulting with users to implement universal design?

image shows people putting block of wood together to create a towerThis literature review captured articles about projects that attempted to achieve universal design or user-centred design by consulting with users throughout the design process. The studies were predominantly qualitative case studies, in which a variety of different methods were used. These techniques included the full participation of users in the design process, the use of hidden cameras, observation, focus groups, scaled cardboard models and 3-D virtual environments. Some important considerations for consulting with users are raised in the literature.

Download the Camps and Consultation report here

See also Integrating the principles of universal design into camps

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UD and Sport and Recreation Facilities

Evan WilkinsonEvan Wilkinson outlines the process that Sport and Recreation Victoria went through to bring about a better understanding of the principles of universal design and how they can be applied to sporting infrastructure and recreational programs. One of his key arguments is that if universal design principles are considered at the outset, the cost implications are low. However, if left until later in the design and construction process, the cost of ‘adding on’ access features is far more costly. Download the PDF of the PowerPoint Slideshow. (5.5 MB)

Sport and Recreation Victoria have also launched their Design for Everyone Guide. The link takes you to the website that also has a very useful video on universal design shown below.

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Design for Children

Design for childrenLandscape architects will appreciate this thoughtful book chapter by Shweta Nanekar about child friendly environments. Part way through the chapter universal design is introduced, “However, when designing outdoor environments for children, including childcare centers, schools or public parks, it is essential to think above and beyond accessibility standards. Populations with physical disabilities are proportionately less than those with sensory disabilities which include Autism Spectrum Disorder, Attention Deficit Disorder, and other social and cognitive disabilities. On a broader scale, multigenerational and cultural inclusion should also be a consideration, especially in public spaces. It is a challenge for the designers of children’s spaces to make the adaptable for each user”. Download the chapter (page 190) from Researchgate

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Designing mobile apps for a National Park

Yosemite 1Creating Alternative Formats. The design of brochures for National Park Service in the USA has evolved into reliance on graphic images of pictures and maps as a means of stimulating interest in visiting. However, this style of brochure does not lend itself well to audio description and other formats. This article traces the detailed research into formulating appropriate designs for alternative formats. Adopting a components-based approach, the intention was to provide clear pathways for cross-modal translation of the printed material into audio-described media, which then, can be efficiently distributed via mobile apps, as an extension of these original components. There is also a link to the Unigrid system that is applied to all NPS brochures.

 

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Universal Design at Camp Manyung

This excellent video shows how the application of universal design principles throughout the design of the camp facilities and camp activities, including staff attitudes, can bring about the inclusiveness that is the aim of universal design. The camp is run by YMCA on behalf of Sport and Recreation Victoria.

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Physical Access and Sport

Access-for-all-publication-211x300An accessible and inclusive sports club sometimes requires a few physical adjustments to buildings, but more than anything it needs some forward planning and continuing commitment.
You can download the English Federation of Sport guide from the Centre for Accessible Environments website – free publications section.

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