Housing Design Guide from South Australia

Photo used for front cover of guide. It shows an outdoor area similar to a veranda.Housing for Life: Designed for Living was developed for the South Australian Government with an emphasis on population ageing and supporting active ageing policies. The report documents the features and factors that older people themselves identified as important as well as industry perspectives. It also outlines the economic arguments for considering the housing needs of older people. Examples of floor plans are included. The key principles identified through the co-design process are: 

Choice: Older people want to have choices about how they live, and scope to personalise their homes.
Quality: It is better to invest in quality fixtures and fittings now for better efficiency and maintenance in the long term.
Wellbeing: Wellbeing is a direct result of connectedness with community and home.
Design: The concept of passive and flexible design that adapts to people’s changing requirements, needs to be central to new Housing SA builds.
Cost: Older people prefer smart investment and the ability to personalise their homes, to ensure cost efficiencies are retained, but without sacrificing good design.
Smart: The integration of smart technology and renewable energy ensures these homes stand the test of time and remain affordable.
Access: Proximity to transport, services and the community is fundamental to living and ageing well, as are neighbourhoods that are easy to get around and foster active travel choices.

The report concludes: “There is significant economic opportunity to be gained by addressing housing, social and ageing related needs through innovative design.
> Technology has a critical role to play in meeting unmet needs for independent living, connected living and well-designed housing.
> Older people are an extremely diverse group and no single design will meet all needs. Age friendly housing options should be as diverse as the people who will live in them. However, there are core principles that apply across this population group and from these, flexible design can be developed.
> Co-design between the housing sector and end-users is essential for accurate and relevant design.
> Quality design and product are highly valued and of equal importance to design features that address ageing-related challenges.
> Features that are valued in age friendly housing and neighbourhood design are energy efficiency, natural lighting, connection between indoor and outdoor spaces, walkability, proximity to transport and services, connection to community balanced with privacy and security, and capacity for personalisation.”

The report is 16 pages in PDF.

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