Emoji to get diverse

Six emoji are shown. A girl in a power chair, an ear with an aid, an assistance dog, a guide dog, a prosthetic arm, a boy in a manual wheelchairThe emoji include guide dogs, people using canes and wheelchairs, and hearing aids. Apple claims it wants to better represent people with disabilities. In a statement, Apple said, “Currently, emoji provide a wide range of options, but may not represent the experiences of those with disabilities. One in seven people around the world has some form of disability.  The proposed additions are not meant to be a comprehensive list of all possible depictions of disabilities – it is intended to be a starting point”. If approved, the emoji are likely to be released early in 2019. This article and graphics was taken from the news.sky.com website.

Apple worked with various charities on the new designs

 

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Pinterest now more accessible

A picture of a mobile phone with a red screen showing a white Pinterest logoPinterest Lead Designer, Long Cheng, was dismayed to find that people with low vision could not get past the sign up screen. So they couldn’t create an account to access content. While iOS and Android each have an accessibility feature – Voice Over and Talk Back, which read aloud the buttons and options, Pinterest had failed to design their app with this type of feature. Similarly to Facebook and Twitter and other apps, Pinterest has a contingent of blind and low vision users. They bookmark stories and other items in the same way as others. You can read Long Cheng’s article written from a designer’s perspective and how Pinterest went about making the app more accessible and inclusive. Good to see companies confronting their shortcomings and not just changing their designs, but their culture to be more inclusive. This item was found on CoDesign website.  

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