Cinema, Users, and Public Space

Front cover of the publication showing a long gradual flight of steps in a street with a travellator running beside itThree papers from the latest issue of International Journal of Architecture and Planning address universal design. Once you scroll through the usual context-setting paragraphs on the principles of UD, the research itself has something to offer.

Disability and Otherization: Readings on Cinema in The Light of UD Principles. The study is about the relationship between architecture and disability in cinema, and how it is portrayed. Using 6 well-known films that include othering, the researchers apply the 7 principles of UD to analyse how disability is portrayed. Interesting way of dissecting societal attitudes and how such films might impact on social attitudes perhaps reinforcing prejudices.

User-Involved Universal Design Experience in the Space, Product and Service Development Process, concludes that universal design is about multiple users regardless of the design discipline. The aim was to encourage students to design beyond specialised “disability products” and to integrate a wide spectrum of users.

Public Space and Accessibility examines pedestrian ways including ramps. Specific dimensions make this a guide largely for wheelchair access. Car parking and bus stops are also covered. The article reports on a workshop they ran on UD. It ends with the note that other disabilities including cognitive diversity now need to be considered. Perhaps of most interest to access consultants to compare with Australian standards.  

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4 Built environment resources for practitioners

The IDeA Center at Buffalo is a research institute set within the Architecture faculty. It has a good website with publications and other resources. Here are just four of the books. They can be purchased online. Go to the IDeA website for details of books and where to purchase.

Inclusive Design: Implementation and Evaluation

Inclusive Design: Implementation and Evaluation. 

The book focuses on the direct application of universal design concepts with technical information. Good for designers, contractors, builders, and building owners.

Accessible Public Transportation: Designing Service for Riders with Disabilities

Accessible Public Transportation: Designing Service for Riders with Disabilities

This book is about public transit systems with a focus on inclusive solutions for people with disability and older people. Includes best practice examples.

Universal Design: Creating Inclusive Environments

Universal Design: Creating Inclusive Environments

Readers are introduced to the principles and practice of designing for all people. Includes best practice examples.

Inclusive Housing: A Pattern Book

 

Inclusive Housing: A Pattern Book

A book for designing homes with everyone in mind. Includes disability specific information.

 

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Would cities designed by women be better?

A man walks backward down steps holding the front of the pram while they mother holds the handles. They are going down a flight of steps in a public place.What if mothers and age pensioners were designers? asks Christine Murray in the UK edition of The Guardian. She laments the low number of females in architecture, “they are all male and pale” also alluding to the lack of ethnic diversity as well. She analyses the built environment and transport systems from the perspective of a mother with small children and a pram, and includes lack of toilets for good measure. While this article is based on Murray’s experiences in London, I hope that there are some things we do better in Australian cities. However, we are still a long way from meeting policy commitments on accessible public transport and train stations. In Sydney I regularly see people dragging suitcases up steps at train stations as well as strollers. At least it can be done albeit with effort. But what if you can’t do steps?  

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Is inclusive design achievable?

architecture blueprint with rule and pencilDo architects have the skills and attitude we need to create truly inclusive environments? Is it even possible to design architecture for everyone? These two questions were put to Jane Duncan, president of the Royal Institute of British Architects. She says architects are in pole position, but we are still polarising people into people with disability and people without disability. It is time we realised “that we just need to design for people.” The article in Smart Cities Library is short but to the point. As a person who is just five feet one inch, Jane Duncan finds many things physically out of her reach. So she is in a good position to call for architects to design for diversity. The website has other good items. 

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Compression and depression

View from high building in Brisbane overlooking building roofs and the Brisbane river and bridges. Jacaranda trees can be seen in the street.Compressed urban footprints might be related to higher rates of depression. Drawing a long bow here? Maybe not. In, Mind over matter: The restorative impact of perceived open space, the authors argue that the loss of natural open space could be having a detrimental affect on mental health: “By 2050 three out of four people will live in urban environments.This premium on open space will reduce vital access to the healing effects of undisturbed nature”. The article by David Navarrete and Bill Witherspoon discusses some of the neuroscience about enclosed spaces, lack of natural light and other factors and how they relate to our perceptions of the world around us. There are references for further reading at the end of the article. The article was posted on the Conscious Cities website.

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Architecture students’ attitudes to UD

architecture blueprint with rule and pencilThe attitudes of architecture students to universal design is the focus of a Deakin University study. It builds on previous work (Design 4 Diversity) in 2010 on inter-professional learning for architecture and occupational therapy students. The findings of this latest study show that while architecture students viewed access to public environments favourably, there was a mixed response in relation to private homes.

Reasons not to include universal design features in homes included cost, client desires and restrictions on creativity. For example, “Over-designing for the sake of making the residence accessible in the future, just in case, is an unnecessary cost”; “Private homes should be designed to the individual”; and “Legislation restricts design, resulting in negative impacts the ‘requirements’ did not intend”. (Ed Note: These phrases have been used many times by practicing architects and designers as followers of UD are aware.)

The study used a quantitative approach and applied statistical techniques to the data. The first part of the document covers the history of universal design (as all such studies do) and there is an extended section on methods and statistics. For followers of UD, the Discussion section might be of most interest. 

The authors of Students’ Attitudes to Universal Design in Architecture Education, are Helen Larkin, Kelsey Dell, and Danielle Hitch. It was published in the Journal of Social Inclusion, 2016.

See also previous work by Larkin et al, on this topic, and the 2016 UD Conference presentation by Nicholas Loder and Lisa Stafford, “Moving from the Margins: Embedding inclusive thinking in design education” 

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Resistance to accessible architecture and design

Disability and qualitative inquiry book coverDisability and Qualitative Inquiry: Methods for Rethinking an Ableist World includes a chapter using autoenthographic techniques. The authors are designers: Carla Corroto is an interior designer, and Lucinda Kaukas Havenhand an architect.They explain the method of collaborative autoethnography and how it was applied to the study of design professionals. Most of the information available to design professionals about accessibility and inclusion rests on dimensions for circulation spaces for wheelchair users. The authors’ interactions with design professional sought to include aesthetics as well as usability. As both authors live with disability, their individual narratives bring to life some of the realities of their interactions. The chapter is titled “Institutional resistance to accessible architecture and design: A collaborative autoethnography“.

The chapter can be viewed in Google Books which gives some or most of the pages. The e-book can be purchased from Google Books.

 

 

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Architectural design for people who are deaf

Who would think that deafness and ramps are connected? When people are signing to communicate, it’s easier and more fluent if they don’t have to climb a flight of steps and watch where their feet are going.

This four minute video shows how basic design features both inside and outside buildings include people who use signing to communicate. The features shown are universal because they are good for everyone.

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