Every train should have auto ramps

The sliding step at the train doorway allows for easy access.Merseyrail in the north of England has a set of new trains with a low floor at each doorway with an intelligent sliding step. The technology uses a sensor to detect the distance to the platform. Then a reinforced automated step slides out to bridge the gap between the train and the platform. It’s commonly used in Switzerland which means it is well tested. If other countries can order trains with universal easy access, why can’t that be done across Australia?

Passengers are getting on a train in Perth. There is a yellow plate that covers the gap between the platform and carriage.Perth in Australia has a similar convenience to Merseyrail so that no-one has to mind the gap when getting on and off. You can read more about the Merseyrail project on the Intelligent Transport website: Improving Accessibility on Merseyrail with New Trains

The new Sydney Metro has designed a close match between the train doors and the platform. It means that most wheeled devices can make the transition from the train to the platform. But every other train system in Sydney, including Light Rail, still requires a station attendant to put out the ramp for wheelchair users. And this has to be pre-arranged. Parents with prams, people with luggage or people a little unsteady on their feet still need to “mind the gap”.  How about some retrofitting with this technology? That would save staff time and provide dignified independent access for all. Other passengers would be happy too.

The top picture is the Merseyrail train, and the bottom picture was taken in Perth. You can just see the yellow “bridge” between the train and the platform.

Inclusive Tourism; What to do in Australia?

Front cover of the summary report. Two people are watching a sunset over the ocean. One is sitting in a wheelchair.Austrade commissioned a report into accessible tourism in Victoria and Queensland. Once again we are given the economics and the size of the tourism market. It shows Australia is missing out on both international and national tourism opportunities. Clearly economics and legal obligations aren’t sufficient to change the attitudes of tourism operators, otherwise change would have happened by now. There is much information in this document for anyone who wants to include this sector of the market in their operations. Many forget inclusive travel includes companions and family members. Nevertheless, one hotel, or one attraction alone is not enough. It needs a community-wide approach where operators of venues, accommodation, attractions and destinations work together. Having an accessible room is of no use unless there are accessible places to go to. An article in the West Australian provides an overview of the situation using the content of the report.

The title of the report is, “Accessible Tourism in Victoria and Queensland Final Report“. Or you can read the Summary Report.  

England and Scotland Guidebooks for the accessible way

A street scene. Cobbled roadway between five and six storey heritage buildings with Scottish flags flyingWhile many places in the U.K. offer accessible features for guests with disability, 63 percent don’t promote the fact according to Bill Forrester in his TravAbility newsletterVisitEngland and VisitScotland have launched a website for tourism businesses to produce accessibility guides to help overcome this problem. Chris Veitch, who helped devise the guides will be talking about these at the upcoming Universal Design Conference along with Bill Forrester. People with disability and older people rarely travel alone – at least no more than the general population. So it is not just one person avoiding inaccessible places – it can be a whole family or travel group.

Tourism operators can use the new, free website, www.accessibilityguides.org, to produce and publish their accessibility guides. These guides should also be useful for Australian tourism operators as well. 

Accessible Agritourism

People are looking at bright orange pumpkins piled in rows in a field on a farmInclusive tourism has received a lot of attention recently. One area that hasn’t had a lot of attention in Australia is accessible AgriTourism. A well designed conference poster published by Ohio State University encapsulates the key points. The poster poses this question: “Ohio has almost 700 farms with an agritourism feature, which brings visitors to vineyards, orchards, and corn mazes, but are these farms welcoming to everyone?” Using photos it explains how to make farms and vineyards more accessible to everyone. Tasmania also has a 2017 draft Agritourism Strategy, but it doesn’t say anything about inclusion and accessibility. 

Editor’s Note: Sneak preview –  inclusive tourism is a major theme for CUDA’s upcoming UD conference. Presenters include keynote Chris Veitch, Nadia Feeney from the Australian Tourism Data Warehouse, Bill Forrester from Travability, and Chris Maclean from Local Government NSW among others.