Website design guides compared

A pair of older hands are placed over the keyboard of a computer.Buried in this paper is a comparison chart of web design features for improved accessibility for older people. Older people have been singled out in this study because they are most at risk of being left out of the evolving digital world which includes e-health and internet based health information. The authors have combed through several guidelines and picked out the main elements that relate to this group because the WCAG 2.0 guidelines are deficient in this area. So they have turned to organisations such as the US-based AARP for the additional design features needed to help deal with motor and cognitive issues, and low vision. The article is in both English and Spanish.

The title isReview of accessibility and usability guidelines for website design for the elderly people

ABSTRACT: By 2050, the growth of the elderly population in Colombia is estimated at 10% and thus a greater demand for special services (such as health services) for the elderly. This justifies the exploration of digital health content as an important source of information for this population. The accessibility and usability guidelines for website design – e.g., TAW and WACG – do not have special guidelines to mitigate the motor, cognitive or visual disabilities characteristic of aging, which become a barrier for this group to consult necessary information for administrative processes that involve health. This review of accessibility and usability guidelines is presented, facilitating the consumption of special contents and generating better interactions with such systems, which will lead to the construction of guidelines based on existing recommendations that allow the development of aspects related to interaction, legibility and usability in digital content for the elderly.