Gadgets, appliances and devices: not so accessible

The electronic display panel on a Samsung appliance showing many wash options and cycles. It’s easier to go with what you know. Learning how to use new gadgets, appliances and devices takes extra time especially if unfamiliar with new tech. In some cases the designers of these products assume users have prior knowledge. An article on the Choice magazine website covers the issues from the perspective of older users. Current younger generations will no doubt have similar experiences as they grow older. So it is worth considering everyone in designs and make them accessible.

A Samsung fridge and a smartphone side by side. A view of what's inside the fridge is on the phone. No need to open the door.Familiarity is the key to understanding any device. But there are many skill sets and assumed knowledge built into these designs. Claims that products are fun and easy to use is not the case for everyone. For example, assumed knowledge includes: a smartphone needs wi-fi in the home, which then means Internet experience. The ability to download and set up apps and email is also assumed. Then there’s software updates and virus protection. Even the manual needs to be downloaded and we haven’t even got to the phone interface yet. 

People from middle age onwards are finding it difficult to keep up with changes. In spite of the research confirming this, it seems designers are not taking note. They still rely on advertising telling us that things are fun and easy to use. Real accessibility is rare. As we move further into a digital world it is easy to leave lots of people behind without realising it.

The Choice article, Ageing and accessibility, also has a link to a research article, Intuitive Interaction and Older People.

Choice also has specific reviews on appliance accessibility, such as washing machines and dishwashers.  

Images courtesy Samsung.