It was a great conference!

With more than 120 attendees, five countries present and five Australian states represented, it was a very successful Australian Universal Design Conference. The atmosphere was abuzz with like-minded colleagues catching up and new friendships forming. We were welcomed by Meaghan Scanlon, Assistant Minister for Tourism Industry Development, and Neroli Holmes, Acting Anti-Discrimination Commissioner. The conference opened with Nicki Hutley, who gave us the benefit of her years of research and declared that everyone benefits from inclusion both economically and socially. Lots to think about when it comes to self driving cars and Amy Child covered some of the many aspects to consider. Here are some of the slides from concurrent session speakers on day one – more to come next newsletter:

Thea Kurdi from Canada –  Living in Place:Who are we designing for?

Lorraine Guthrie from New Zealand – Accessibility Charter for Canterbury: Collaborating to go beyone compliance

Michael Small – Developing the conditions to support a universal design approach

Emily Steel – Universal Design in social policy: Addressing the paradox of equality

Tom Bevan – Case Study: Accessible beaches for all.

Elise Copeland from New Zealand – A universal design tool for mixed use buildings. Slideshow was too big to upload but the transcript is provided plus the video below. You can go to the Auckland website to see the UD Design Tool.

 

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IAUD Conference Thailand

IAUD logo with coloured matchstick figures.The next International Association for Universal Design Conference will be held in Bankok, Thailand 5-6 March 2019. It is not clear from the website whether the call for submissions closes 31 August 2018 or 30 November, which is definitely the date for full paper submissions. You can find out more from the conference website. Topics are wide-ranging. This is usually a large international affair. IAUD is based in Japan and was originaly initiated by product manufacturers recognising that the population was ageing. Not the most intuitively designed conference website, but the information is there and also links to previous conference papers that could be of interest. .

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Constructing our World Conference 2019

Constructing our world conference bannerSave the Date for this Conference. How should we educate and train our builders for the future? Are our current systems keeping up with the demands of new technology? What might the buildings of the future demand of builders’ knowledge and processes? What are the politicians planning for our sector and how do the financiers see the future for building in our region?  The 2019 Constructing Our World Conference in Sydney will address these questions and more.  The organisers are planning two days of speakers and interactive sessions as well as time to enjoy the sights and attractions of beautiful Sydney. Builders, project managers, educators, students, government policy makers, suppliers and construction allied personnel are sure to enjoy and benefit from attendance at the conference.

There will be an extended program for international delegates which will include fringe events  as well as a welcome reception on the eve of the conference. Constructing Our World is an initiative in collaboration with the Australian Institute of Building, the New Zealand Institute of Building and the Singapore Institute of Building Limited.  

Save the date 18 – 20 September 2019. Expressions of Interest are being accepted now. 

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2018 Assistive Techology Conference

ARATA logoThe Australian Assistive Rehabilitation and Assistive Technology Association conference will be in Melbourne 14-16 November 2018. Three full days of evidence and practice-based sessions, discussions, posters and demonstrations, and much more. National and international keynote speakers, a breakfast session and trade display all make for a jam-packed event.

Universal Design and Assistive Technolgy (AT) are partners in the same quest – inclusion and participation for everyone. AAATE believes that UD (Design for All) and AT should be looked at as part of the same domain of knowledge, rather that deal with these as two distinct domains. Practitioners in the UD world focus on designs that are inclusive and enabling rather than excluding. However, UD is not the answer to everything and some people need individual solutions and specialised designs. The simplest example is a paraplegic needs both a wheelchair and a step-free entry. One is no good without the other. AT is now a major part of the NDIS and there is growing interest in this field

banner for ARATA conference

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