Retiring Retirement

Red Green and Yellow balloons with 100 printed on them in white.Is it time to retire the word “retirement”? Does it have the same meaning now as it did 30-40 years ago? Ending paid work, especially if it wasn’t enjoyable, makes the idea of a permanent holiday a dream come true. But is it? For those who are not the retiring type, the notion of being on holiday for up to 40 years is not something they relish. They want to keep going past the nominated pensionable age. So this area has no one-size-fits-all solutions. But one thing common to all, is having the ability to get out and about and access everyday activities and be welcome everywhere, and to have a home that accommodates issues of ageing. That is, let’s have more universal design rolled out so we can have the choice to do what we want as we age. The BBC webpage has an interesting story about a 106 year old man who continues his medical work on a voluntary basis. Examples of centenarians still working include a barber, who has been cutting people’s hair for 95 years, and aYouTube star aged 107, who teaches her million followers how to cook dishes such as fried emu egg.  

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Will you hire me?

Front cover of report showing hands and a keyboardInclusive employment practice is not usual employment practice. While businesses might have a positive attitude towards the diverse nature of their customer base this does not always apply to their recruitment practices. But a handful of organisations are giving it a try. The Australian Network on Disability (AND), which specialises in assisting organisations to be more inclusive in their human resource practices, has developed an index. This year the top performers are the Federal Department of Human Services, the Australian Taxation Office and ANZ. AND has just published their 2017-2018 benchmark report. It can be downloaded in PDF, Word, video or podcast.  

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How to get colleagues thinking inclusion

A magnifying glass is held over a grid montage of human facesIt’s one thing for an individual in a group or workplace to understand inclusion, universal design and accessibility, but it sometimes seems people turn their ears off when it is mentioned. AND has posted on their website some tips to help get others on board. There are links to other documents and a self assessment tool. The main point is that change is a slow process – a journey. It needs a whole-of-business approach – one person cannot do it alone, but perhaps it is a start. Story-telling is a good tool too and they have links to videos. It is timely for ABC TV to be broadcasting a program on 3 April called Employable Me. The series draws on science and experts to uncover their hidden skills. It follows people with neuro-diverse conditions such as autism, OCD and Tourette Syndrome as they search for meaningful employment. The Australian Human Rights Commission published a report “Willing to Work” which covers the issues for older people and people with disability. There is an Easy Read version too. 

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