Universal Design Engineering for Learners

A blueprint of three interlocking cog wheels.We need a diversity blueprint to help students learn whether it’s a webinar, lecture, or e-learning course. According to Keith Edyburn that means taking an engineering approach to universal design for learning (UDL). He reports on nine case studies and introduces the Design for More Types model. The aim is to turn design concepts into practical “active ingredients that can be carefully defined, measured and evaluated”. Edyburn claims personal commitment to the principles of UDL is not sufficient to enhance student engagement. The table below is from the paper, where Edyburn looks at both targeted learners and others who also benefit. 

Table shows the design feature, the Primary Beneficiary and the Secondary Beneficiary.

The thrust of this paper Universal Design Engineering, is that theory is all very well but doesn’t actually make it happen. If you take a practical engineering approach, you are more likely to engage students and increase their success rate. There is more detail about turning information into digital text, testing designs, and determining cost-benefit.

The paper is from the proceedings of the UDHEIT 2018 conference held in Dublin, Ireland, an open access publication. 

Lights, Camera, Action: Training actors with disability

A man stands against a greenbox bacground with lights and cameras around himWhat’s involved in training actors with disability? This is one topic that needs a lot more exploration now that people with disability are being included in productions. One place to start is the material that’s been developed for Universal Design for Learning (UDL). Deric McNish’s book chapter, Training Actors with Disabilities, provides an interesting perspective on the issues and discusses various approaches to theatre courses. You will need institutional access for a free read. The chapter can be purchased from SpringerLink.

Abstract: This essay presents accessible training methods for students with disabilities in college acting, voice, and movement courses. It presents teaching strategies selected from a survey of prominent professors, as well as from actors with disabilities that have worked professionally and completed an actor training program. This paper presents some valuable perspectives on a largely unexplored topic and offers multiple approaches, including ways to adapt popular acting, voice, speech, and movement pedagogies for the greatest variety of students, ways to effectively communicate with college students with disabilities, ways to apply Universal Design for Learning in practice-based theatre courses, and responsible strategies for portraying disability identity during in-class scene work.

Financial Literacy for Everyone

A calculator and a bank statement are sitting on a desk.Understanding finance-speak is difficult for quite a few of us according to the latest HILDA survey reported in The Conversation. Perhaps it is time to take a look at what they are doing in Universal Design for Learning on this topic. If curriculum designers can devise a program for young people with disabilities about to enter the workforce then perhaps it would work for the rest of us. The article in The Conversation highlights the inequitable divide by age and gender when it comes to understanding finances. This is another reason to apply universal design principles to financial literacy. While women scored lower than men, generally men still have low levels of financial literacy. Given that most adults can function well in other areas of literacy, the finance sector has much to do to bring us up to speed. Low levels of financial literacy are over-represented in poverty statistics so this has to be addressed from the perspective of equity and inclusion. The article in The Conversation has a five question test you can take and a video of 10 emerging trends in Australia as well as more information from the HILDA data.