A train that flies?

TShows a white set of plane wings with a fuselage pod underneath aking off for a new adventure or a new adventure taking off? The latest idea could make accessing aircraft so much easier for everyone, especially smaller ones.  An article in the New Daily explains this sci-fi idea. Imagine boarding the aircraft body at a train station and then being transported to the wings of the aircraft sitting on the tarmac. Time would be saved as passengers could be processed on the go. There seems to be no shortage of ideas now that disrupt the way we think about everything we do.  The article has a mock up video of this Link & Fly idea. You can see it below. There is no narration, only music, so no captions.

Futuristic flying trains could be on their way

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Making transport work for people

Front cover of the reportIt seems the more disadvantaged a community or individual is, the less likely they are to access public transportation systems that work for them. This is the argument posed in a report based on research in California that looked into the issues. The outcome of the research is a Mobility Equity Framework based on two principles: social equity and community power. The pose a three step process that serves as a guide to elevate community engagement in planning and decision-making. This is followed by 12 mobility equity indicators under three goals: Access, Clean Air and Economic Opportunity. It also provides a mechanism to evaluate the equity in transportation modes. The Greenlining Institute introduces the Framework:

“For too long, transportation planning has focused on cars rather than people while neglecting communities of color and low-income neighborhoods. This framework offers planners and community advocates a step-by-step guide to a more community-centered transportation planning process that focuses on the mobility needs of communities and puts affected communities at the center of decision-making.

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Barriers to travel not the same for everyone

Picture of people carrying luggage up 56 step to the train platform. There is a wheelchair platform lift folded up at the bottom.The latest article on inclusive travel by Bob McKercher and Simon Darcy presents a systematic framework of the range of barriers affecting the ability of people with disability to travel. It is classified into a four tier framework from generic to specific. Below is an excerpt from the abstract explaining more about the four tier framework:

Previous studies tended to aggregate barriers into a single group … The failure to recognise the complex, yet subtle interplay between tourism and different types of barriers results in the tendency to see people with disabilities as a homogeneous group where a one size fits all solution applies. In reality, they are a heterogeneous cohort who face the same types of barriers as everyone, some barriers that are common to all people with disabilities, those that are unique to each disability dimension and specific impairment effects that are individualistic.

The full title of the article is “Re-conceptualizing barriers to travel by people with disabilities”, and is available from Science Direct, or directly from Simon Darcy on Research Gate.  Published in Tourism Management Perspectives.  

 

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Transport and Health

Newsletter front cover showing a wide pathway with trees and shrubs on either side.The Professional Association for Transport and Health (PATH) newsletter has information for people interested in healthy transport and transportation. This quarterly newsletter has the following topics:

  • In the Know: What’s Happening Globally
  • A European Cycling Trip
  • Publications & Articles of Interest
  • Doctoral/Post-Doctoral & Employment Opportunities

Front cover of the journal: mostly green with some blue shading and white textOf most relevance to universal design is the special issue of the Journal of Transport and Health, Built Environment, Transport and Health. At the end of the newsletter there is a list of open access articles. One of interest to UD is Older People’s Experiences of Mobility and Mood in an Urban Environment

 

Editor’s Note: I have suggested that they might review the font type and size, and format for easier reading for their next issue.

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Aircraft cabin design

Picture shows the front view of a sea plane on the tarmacAir travel has seen significant growth in recent years, but many of the issues of accessibility and inclusion have yet to be resolved. Some horror stories are reported in the media, but this has not resulted in the changes needed for worry-free journeys for all. Getting from the drop off point to the aircraft seat is fraught with many potential obstacles. Carina Campese et al describe their visits to assistive technology companies and trade fairs to find appropriate equipment that airlines might use to make life easier for people experiencing difficulty with mobility, hearing and vision. They have some good recommendations for airlines and airport authorities based on their research. They acknowledge that staff training is also an essential element and will be the subject of subsequent research. The sea plane pictured indicates some of the difficulties airlines face in embracing accessibility for all.

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