Easy Access to Historic Landscapes – A guide

Front cover of the guide with four pictures of people in different historic locationsHistoric landscapes, gardens and open spaces are there for everyone to enjoy. Historic England has produced a guide for anyone working to open up historic sites to a wider audience by providing easier access for all visitors. This revised edition of the 2005 guide promotes an inclusive approach to ensure that every visitor to an historic park, garden or landscape has a meaningful experience – not just physical access. Property owners and managers designers, and planners should find the guide helpful in tackling all aspects of the visitor experience. The key elements of the guide are:

1. Why access matters

2. Planning better access

3. Making access a reality

4. Published sources of information

5. Where to get advice  

This is a companion to Easy Access to Historic Buildings.  

Growing trend in Intergenerational Play Spaces

Aerial photo of Lillydale Lake PlayspaceWhat should play spaces look like for all ages? Inspired by a 10-year old resident from Lilydale, Melbourne, Yarra Ranges Council committed a $1.4million upgrade to the Lilydale Lake playground in 2014. The recently completed project was developed in consultation with local primary school children. The Council found that the two main priorities for the children were:

  • Emphasis on nature over plastic materials; and
  • Play areas for all ages.

“They actually wanted a space where their parents will play with them,” Ms Robyn Mansfield, the Council’s manager of built and active spaces. “Where their older siblings will want to play with them, where their grandparents will want to play with them.”  More information on the Park can be found on the ABC website.    

Not just accessible, but inclusive playgrounds

Distance shot of children on a carousel or spinnerAn accessible playground is good, but would be better if it is also inclusive. Having a continuous path of travel is a great start, but what if the child cannot leave the path to join in the activities? Four playgrounds in Turkey are the subject of a research report, which provides good recommendations and the reasons behind them. It shows how to apply the seven principles of universal design to playgrounds. For example, Principle 2, Flexible Use “ensure that spaces are designed so as to be easily understood, to give children the opportunity to try and succeed and to make the users feel safe”. Australia’s Livvi’s Place playgrounds gets a mention.

The article is titled, No “Obstacles” In Playgrounds That Are Not Only Accessible But Also Inclusive, by Hatice Ayatac and Ipek Pola. Published in the ICONARP International Journal Of Architecture & Planning.  

For more thrills see the TreeTops Crazy Rider on NSW Central Coast – fun for everyone. 

Fair Play: Inclusion begins in the playground

UD-logo-200x200Edited transcript of Bec Ho and Justine Perkins presentation.

Synopsis: Including children with a disability in outdoor play is possible with some careful design planning. All children benefit from learning through play and using outdoor activities to socialise and interact with each other regardless of their level of capability. Bec and Justine provide insightful case studies and an overview of the Touched by Olivia Foundation.

Bec Ho, Justine Perkins Presentation Transcript PDF

Bec Ho, Justine Perkins Presentation Transcript Word

Bec Ho, Justine Perkins Slideshow PDF 9MB