Guides for inclusive and accessible events

People standing watching a band on stage. There are fireworks in the background. Inclusive and accessible events.Eventually we will emerge from COVID lockdowns and the event and conference industry will get going again. This is a good time for venue owners and event managers to find ways to be more inclusive. And that doesn’t mean asking speakers or attendees to nominate their individual requirements. So here are some guides for inclusive and accessible events. 

The Australian Network on Disability (AND) has a webpage with a basic checklist which is a good place to begin. It covers choosing a venue, invitations, marketing, wayfinding, room arrangements and catering. 

Front cover of Zero Conference Accessibility Guidelines.The Zero Project guidelines are based on real experience of running conferences. The guide is comprehensive and detailed, and explains the development of the guidelines. 

The New South Wales Government has an Event Starter Guide webpage which includes a section on accessibility. The guide covers transportation, parking, signage, and communicating access features, and more. There is also a Toolkit for accessible and inclusive events that has a checklist and accessibility symbols. 

Front cover of City of Sydney guidelines.The City of Sydney Inclusive and accessible event guidelines include information on why events should be inclusive. It has information on the different types of disability people experience. It has four sections covering indoor and outdoor events and a set of checklists:

    1. Accessible venues and spaces
    2. Opportunities for inclusive participation
    3. Accessible materials and information
    4. Staff awareness and attitudes

There are more posts on meetings, events and festivals in the Inclusive Events and Conferences section of this website.