Colours that are accessible

Colour diagram showing the three different types of colour vision deficiencyColour is an important part of designers’ creative work. When it comes to colour accessibility the creative path takes a few twists and turns. That’s because people who say they are ‘colour blind’ are not all the same. Most can see some colours, but not all of them. So how can designers choose colours that are accessible, especially in digital communications?

Adobe has a blog page that explains the importance of choosing colours. Four images show the three different versions of colour vision deficiency, which are:

    1. Protanopia: Referred to as “red weakness,” this variation of red/green color blindness results in individuals being unable to perceive red light.
    2. Deuteranopia: Also known as “green weakness,” this type of red/green color blindness renders people unable to perceive any green light.
    3. Tritanopia: People who suffer from blue/yellow color blindness have difficulty distinguishing between blue and yellow colors. This form of color blindness is far less common than its red and green counterparts.

Graphic designers will appreciate the colour wheels and ways to avoid a conflict of colours. Examples of good colour choices show that designs can still be attractive as well as functional.

Manisha Gupta says in her article Color choices that are accessible

“Color is a foundational element in any creative work. When I took the challenge to design the Color Accessibility feature for Adobe Color, it wasn’t a linear path. While I was conducting research and learning more about accessibility, I realized there was no single tool that holistically helps a designer make a choice of colors that are color-blind safe — a choice that impacts roughly 300 million people globally. This made the case for bringing accessibility into Adobe Color even more compelling, and it is one reason why Adobe wants accessibility to be part of every creative’s process right from the beginning of a project.”