I haven’t been asked that before

part of a computer screen with black background and some words indicating coding.The answer to “Is your site accessible?” is sometimes, “I haven’t been asked that before” or “I’m not sure I understand what you  mean”. Some website managers will quote that they are WCAG2 compliant, but that doesn’t mean they know what it’s about. Some parts of the website design might be compliant, but some of the content might not be. So things like e-books, e-learning or customised apps could pose problems when it comes to accessibility for all. An article by Andreea Demirgian takes a look at these issues and more by using real examples of online chat conversations with web operators. 

A related article, Do you see what I see… Accessibility challenge – CSS! gives instructions on how to find out if the CSS of the website is a barrier to accessibilty. A bit technical but gives insights into what web design should consider. The article is by Herin Hentry of the Reserve Bank of Australia.  

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Screen magnifiers: Just a bit at a time

The Google trade mark name has a magnifying glass held over it.Screen magnifiers are used by people who have low vision. It enlarges the text and images to a size where only part of the page or picture is visible at any one time. It is not the same as using the zoom function in the browser where the layout is changed to match the width of the screen. This means users have to scroll sideways to get the content of the page.

Because only a portion of the screen is displayed, the reader could miss instructions or drop down menus. How to Make Your Website Accessible to People Who Use a Screen Magnifier, has some good tips and a short video that shows what a screen magnifier does. The tips in the article are aimed at people in charge of websites. However, it is useful to see how it works and what happens when a site design doesn’t account for screen readers. It could help us think about the way we format documents and other information for websites.

It’s worth noting that there are around ten times as many people who use magnifiers and not screen readers, but accessibility guidelines seem to focus on readers. There is more on this topic from Axess Lab.

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Do your pictures tell a story?

A screenshot of the Vision Australia screen and logo.Making images and graphs accessible is something we can all do. Once you get into the habit it’s simple. The process is called “Alt -text” or alternative text. It provides a text alternative to documents, slide shows and web pages. The WebAIM blog site gives more detail about applying text to images. In short, it does three key things:

  • It is read by screen readers so it’s accessible to people who are blind or have certain cognitive disabilities.
  • On websites it is displayed in place of the image if the image file is not loaded or when the user has chosen not to view images.
  • The text description can be read by search engines.

Even if you are not in charge of your organisation’s website, any pictures you provide for web content should have your description and not be left to someone else to interpret. They might get the picture out of context. The article explains more about context. 

For specific information on Word and PowerPoint images, the University of Minnisota has some instructions. Twitter also has instructions on picture descriptions for tweets. Media Access Australia has information on this topic, as well as Captcha options.

From the Editor: I describe all pictures and images on this website. This is not the same as having a caption. Two tips: No need to start the description with “A picture of…” because the screen reader knows it is a picture or graphic and announces it. End the description with a full stop. It makes the screen reader use a tone that ends the sentence rather than sounding as if it is cut off in the middle. Also, avoid “download here” or “click here” and put the link in the actual text so the screen reader and user knows what it is referring to. 

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